We Now Know Who Jack The Ripper Actually Was

For years criminologists and amateur sleuths have tried to solve the mystery of the notorious killer Jack the Ripper’s identity.

For years criminologists and amateur sleuths have tried to solve the mystery of the notorious killer Jack the Ripper’s identity.

Now though, respected author Patricia Cornwell has claimed she’s finally solved the mystery after spending £5.7million on the investigation, The Mirror reports.

So who does she believe the notorious killer is?
Well Cornwell points the finger at Walter Sickert, a renowned British Impressionist painter who had a morbid obsession with Saucy Jack.

To get to the bottom of the Ripper case Patricia employed some of the best and brightest criminal experts in the world and she first proposed the Sickert theory 15 years ago in her 2002 book Portrait of a Killer: Jack the Ripper – Case Closed.

Patricia stood by her accusations however and claims the proof is in her new book Ripper : The Secret Life of Walter Sickert.

Sickert, who’d had the privilege of painting Prime Ministers and was known as a cosmopolitan and eccentric who favoured ordinary people and urban scenes

Sickert, who’d had the privilege of painting Prime Ministers and was known as a cosmopolitan and eccentric who favoured ordinary people and urban scenes

had a strange obsession with the Ripper proudly claiming he once stayed in a room used by the serial killer.
Cornwell now believes that Sickert is the only credible suspect in the Whitechapel murders of the canonical five, (Mary Ann Nichols, Annie Chapman, Elizabeth Stride, Catherine Eddowes and Mary Jane Kelly) in the 1880s.

So what proof does Cornwell have?

So what proof does Cornwell have?

According to the author, Sickerts work, which feature strangely dark portraits of women, resemble the Ripper’s mutilated victims, in particular the portrait Le Journal which shows a woman wearing a tight necklace, with her head back and mouth open.

Patricia points out that the work looks eerily similar to Catherine Eddowes who had her throat slashed open by the Ripper.

It’s not all circumstantial evidence though

It’s not all circumstantial evidence though

As Patricia also discovered that three letters Sickert sent at the time came from the same paper run of just 24 sheets, as two of the Ripper’s letters.

She also points out that the infamous ‘From Hell’ letters were full of doodles, much like Sickert’s own letters.

Unfortunately for Patricia, Sickert does have a pretty good alibi for not being the Ripper as he was in France at the time allegedly, and the art community has vehemently denied the accusations.

Patricia however believes that people are protecting Sickert’s reputation as she believes she’s found evidence that he was in fact in London for at least three of the killings.

Patricia however believes that people are protecting Sickert’s reputation as she believes she’s found evidence that he was in fact in London for at least three of the killings.

She’s not the only person to have accused Sickert.
Stephen Knight maintained that Sickert had been forced to become an accomplice in the Ripper murders in his book Jack the Ripper: The Final Solution.

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